The Right Thing

Read Micah 6:6-8

A reality of life is that at some point, actually at many points, a person is going to wrong another person. This can happen unintentionally or may occur on purpose. After having done something which has wronged another, the question which shows remorse is how might the situation be corrected and/or made right? What is required to compensate for the wrong which has been committed? If it is a legal case, a judge or a jury may make this decision. More often than not, the situation is not a violation of the law so then it falls upon the parties involved to determine how to resolve the matter.

As we look at the passage from Micah, the question above is being asked in regard to a matter between God and the Israelites. God has brought a case against the people because they have continued to be unfaithful toward the Lord. They have worshipped false gods and failed to follow God’s teachings. In spite of all of God’s redeeming acts and daily provisions, the people refuse to listen and follow. Once called out for this wrong, the question of how to respond is posed. Should the people offer sacrifices to regain God’s favor? The response given is that the people have already been told and it has nothing to do with ritual sacrifices. It has to do with how they live their lives. The way to show faithfulness to the Lord is to “act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.” This is the way to rectify the wrong and return to faithfulness.

Not only do we regularly wrong other people, we consistently wrong the Lord. These words from the prophet encapsulate all the teachings from Moses and all the prophets. Our failure to do these three things is what is defined as sin. These life behaviors will keep us from wronging other people and wronging God.

Acting justly is demonstrated by looking out for the welfare of one another. By ensuring each other’s needs, physically, emotionally and spiritually, are met then we fulfill this requirement. Loving mercy is evident in our lives when we are quick to forgive instead of seek revenge. When we accept an individual’s failures as much as their successes, we are showing the compassion which mercy entails. Walking humbly with our God means recognizing the greatness of the Lord. Realizing the power of God is demonstrated in the love and grace of God is truly a humbling experience. Acknowledging we are not God and so we keep our attitudes and attempts to control in check is necessary to walk humbly. The walk is daily and without end which requires time and commitment.

If Convenient

Read Luke 9:57-62

Since the onset of the Industrial Age, people have been on a continuous path toward convenience. We have become people that seek a more convenient life in which we do not labor as hard and have more opportunities for leisure and recreation. If you have been to the Magic Kingdom in Disney World, you may have enjoyed the ride, Carousel of Progress, in Tomorrowland. This ride takes the guest through various decades and highlights how inventions have made our lives more convenient and our work easier. We have become people who often reject anything which might be inconvenient for us.

In Luke we are told about a time when Jesus encounters potential followers while walking down a road. In each encounter, the person who speaks with Jesus indicates a desire to follow him. The first man is told by Jesus that he must be willing to accept inconvenient accommodations. The other two will only follow if they can do so at a convenient time for them. Jesus points out that following him is not based upon what is convenient for the follower.

How often we are wanting to be convenient followers of Jesus. We appear to be eager to follow but we would like following to not inconvenience us. We set aside a specific time once a week to worship. We agree to attend Bible studies, informative classes, and fellowship times as long as they fit into our schedules and demand a limited amount of time. Our willingness to participate in service projects inside and outside the walls of a church building is contingent on the other activities in our lives and again, if the time commitment is not too much. Like the followers in Luke’s account we are often “I will follow but…” types of Jesus followers.

Jesus requires ALL from us. He requires our time, our talents, our energy, even our very lives. If we are wanting to be followers of Jesus, we must be willing to be inconvenienced.